Type of Surgery

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Last updated: 02/17/2009

Risks

The anesthesiologist should evaluate and follow the patient for potential complications that may include edema; bleeding; tracheal and esophageal perforation; pneumothorax (collapsed lung); and aspiration. The patient should be advised of the potential...

signs and symptoms associated with life-threatening complications of airway problems. These signs and symptoms include but are not limited to sore throat, pain or swelling of the face and neck, chest pain, subcutaneous emphysema, and difficulty swallowing.



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In medicine, intubation refers to the placement of a tube into an external or internal orifice of the body. Although the term can refer to endoscopic procedures, it is most often used to denote tracheal intubation. Tracheal intubation is the placement of a flexible plastic tube into the trachea to protect the patient's airway and provide a means of mechanical ventilation. The most common tracheal intubation is orotracheal intubation where, with the assistance of a laryngoscope, an endotracheal tube is passed through the mouth, larynx, and vocal cords, into the trachea. A bulb is then inflated near the distal tip of the tube to help secure it in place and protect the airway from blood, vomit, and secretions. Another possibility is nasotracheal intubation where a tube is passed through the nose, larynx, vocal cords, and trachea.


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intubation

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