Type of Surgery

Information

Doctor Certified

Last updated: 11/24/2009

Risks

Gastric bypass surgery has many of the same risks associated with any other major abdominal operation. Life-threatening complications or death are rare, occurring in fewer than 1% of patients. Such significant side effects as wound problems, difficulty...

in swallowing food, infections, and extreme nausea can occur in 10–20% of patients. Blood clots after major surgery are rare but extremely dangerous, and if they occur may require re-hospitalization and anticoagulants (blood thinning medication).

Some risks, however, are specific to gastric bypass surgery:

  • Dumping syndrome. Usually occurs when sweet foods are eaten or when food is eaten too quickly. When the food enters the small intestine, it causes cramping, sweating, and nausea.
  • Abdominal hernias. These are the most common complications requiring follow-up surgery. Incisional hernias occur in 10–20% of patients and require follow-up surgery.
  • Narrowing of the stoma. The stoma, or opening between the stomach and intestines, can sometimes become too narrow, causing vomiting. The stoma can be repaired by an outpatient procedure that uses a small endoscopic balloon to stretch it.
  • Gallstones. They develop in more than a third of obese patients undergoing gastric surgery. Gallstones are clumps of cholesterol and other matter that accumulate in the gallbladder. Rapid or major weight loss increases a person's risk of developing gallstones.
  • Leakage of stomach and intestinal contents. Leakage of stomach and intestinal contents from the staple and suture lines into the abdomen can occur. This is a rare occurrence and sometimes seals itself. If not, another operation is required.

Because of the changes in digestion after gastric bypass surgery, patients may develop such nutritional deficiencies as anemia, osteoporosis, and metabolic bone disease. These deficiencies can be prevented by taking iron, calcium, Vitamin B12, and folate supplements. It is also important to maintain hydration and intake of high-quality protein and essential fat to ensure healthy weight loss.



NEXT:
PREVIOUS:

Advertisement

This animation describes the three main types of bariatric surgery. Topics covered include gastric bypass surgery, adjustable gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy.

Related Videos

ROSE Procedure Animation

The ROSE procedure helps patients that have had gastric bypass surgery but are starting to gain weight again. As the video shows, the procedure is "incisionless" because it is performed endoscopically with a thin tube placed down the esophagus. The stomach and esophagus are narrowed as a result of the ROSE procedure.

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

Provides a detailed graphic animation of the roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure. It also explains how this bariatric surgery achieves weight loss.

Sleeve Gastrectomy Animation

A large portion of the stomach is removed during a sleeve gastrectomy. This video provides a 3D animation of how the procedure is performed and what the gastrointestinal system looks like afterwards.

How a gastroscopy is carried out

This narrated video explains what the patient will experience during an EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy). In non-US countries this procedure is sometimes referred to as gastroscopy, but the approach shown in the video provide the doctor with a view of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.

In this Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, a large incision is made down the middle of the abdomen (A).The stomach is separated into two sections. Most of the stomach will be bypassed, so food will no longer go to it. A section of jejunum (small intestine) is then brought up to empty food from the new smaller stomach (B). Finally, the surgeon connects the duodenum to the jejunum, allowing digestive secretions to mix with food further down the jejunum. (Illustration by GGS Inc.) In this Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, a large incision is made down the middle of the abdomen (A).The stomach is separated into two sections. Most of the stomach will be bypassed, so food will no longer go to it. A section of jejunum (small intestine) is then brought up to empty food from the new smaller stomach (B). Finally, the surgeon connects the duodenum to the jejunum, allowing digestive secretions to mix with food further down the jejunum. (Illustration by GGS Inc.)




Search

Other Information

Gastric bypass procedures (GBP) are any of a group of similar operations used to treat morbid obesity—the severe accumulation of excess weight as fatty tissue—and the health problems (comorbidities) it causes. Bariatric surgery is the term encompassing all of the surgical treatments for morbid obesity, not just gastric bypasses, which make up only one class of such operations.

A gastric bypass first divides the stomach into a small upper pouch and a much larger, lower "remnant" pouch and then re-arranges the small intestine to allow both pouches to stay connected to it. Surgeons have developed several different ways to reconnect the intestine, thus leading to several different GBP names. Any GBP leads to a marked reduction in the functional volume of the stomach, accompanied by an altered physiological and psychological response to food. The resulting weight loss, typically dramatic, markedly reduces comorbidities. The long-term mortality rate of gastric bypass patients has been shown to be reduced by up to 40%; however, complications are common and surgery-related death occurs within one month in 2% of patients.


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastric_bypass_surgery

Other Information

Average excess weight loss at five years is 48-74 percent after gastric bypass and 50-60 percent after vertical banded gastroplasty -2004


From: Bariatric-Surgery.info

Find a Qualified Specialist

Looking for a specialist?

Please enter your zip code.