Type of Surgery

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Last updated: 11/24/2009

Risks

Complications may be associated with the laparoscopy procedure in general, or may be specific to the type of operation that is performed. Patients should consult with their doctors regarding the types of risks that are specific for their procedures....

The most serious complication that can occur during laparoscopy is laceration of a major abdominal blood vessel resulting from improper positioning, inadequate insufflation (inflation) of the abdomen, abnormal pelvic anatomy, and too much force exerted during scope insertion. Thin patients with well-developed abdominal muscles are at higher risk, since the aorta may only be an inch or so below the skin. Obese patients are also at higher risk because more forceful and deeper needle and scope penetration is required. During laparoscopy, there is also a risk of bleeding from blood vessels, and adhesions may require repair by open surgery if bleeding cannot be stopped using laparoscopic instrumentation. In laparoscopic procedures that use electrosurgical devices, burns to the incision site are possible due to passage of electrical current through the laparoscope caused by a fault or malfunction in the equipment.

Complications related to insufflation of the abdominal cavity include gas inadvertently entering a blood vessel and causing an embolism, pneumothorax, or subcutaneous emphysema. One common but not serious side effect of insufflation is pain in the shoulder and upper chest area for a day or two following the procedure.

Any abdominal surgery, including laparoscopy, carries the risk of unintentional organ injury (punctures and perforations). For example, the bowel, bladder, ureters, or fallopian tubes may be injured during the laparoscopic procedure. Many times these injuries are unavoidable due to the patient's anatomy or medical condition. Patients at higher risk for bowel injury include those with chronic bowel disease, PID, a history of pervious abdominal surgery, or severe endometriosis. Some types of laparoscopic procedures have a higher risk of organ injury. For instance, during laparoscopic removal of endometriosis adhesions or ovaries, the ureters may be injured due to their proximity to each other.

Several clinical studies have shown that the complication rate during laparoscopy is associated with inadequate surgeon experience. Surgeons who are more experienced in laparoscopic procedures have fewer complications than those performing their first 100 cases.



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This video shows how the large intestine or colon is removed through laparoscopic surgery. The perspective is that of the surgeon performing the colectomy or colon resection. A note to viewers, this video shows surgery on an actual patient. The anatomical landmarks are not labeled, but described by the surgeon narrator.

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This surgeon is performing a laparoscopic procedure on a patient. (Photo Researchers, Inc. Reproduced by permission.) This surgeon is performing a laparoscopic procedure on a patient. (Photo Researchers, Inc. Reproduced by permission.)




The surgeon has a choice of incision options for laparoscopy, depending on the needs of the procedure (A). In this abdominal procedure, carbon dioxide is pumped into the cavity to create a condition called pneumoperitoneum, which allows the surgeon easier access to internal structures. The laparoscope is connected to a video monitor, and special forceps are used to carry out any necessary procedure (C and D) (Illustration by GGS Inc.) The surgeon has a choice of incision options for laparoscopy, depending on the needs of the procedure (A). In this abdominal procedure, carbon dioxide is pumped into the cavity to create a condition called pneumoperitoneum, which allows the surgeon easier access to internal structures. The laparoscope is connected to a video monitor, and special forceps are used to carry out any necessary procedure (C and D) (Illustration by GGS Inc.)




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Other Information

Laparoscopic surgery, also called minimally invasive surgery (MIS), bandaid surgery, keyhole surgery, or pinhole surgery is a modern surgical technique in which operations in the abdomen are performed through small incisions (usually 0.5-1.5cm) as compared to larger incisions needed in traditional surgical procedures. Laparoscopic surgery includes operations within the abdominal or pelvic cavities, whereas keyhole surgery performed on the thoracic or chest cavity is called thoracoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery belong to the broader field of endoscopy.


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laparoscopic_surgery

Other Information

Biliary colic is the presenting symptom in 80% of patients with gallstone disease who seek medical care; however, only 10-20% of all individuals with gallstones experience severe gallstone pain.


From: eMedicine

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