Type of Surgery

Information

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Last updated: 11/24/2009

Morbidity/Mortality

The outcome of the procedure varies with the underlying disease or the extent of other injuries. Rates of complete recovery from the surgery itself are excellent, in the absence of other severe injuries or medical problems.

Splenectomy for HS...

patients is usually delayed in children until the age of five to prevent unnecessary infections; reported outcomes are very good.

Studies of patients with ITP show that 80%–90% of children achieve spontaneous and complete remission in two to eight weeks. A small percentage develop chronic or persistent ITP, but 61% show complete remission by 15 years. No deaths in patients older than 15 have been attributed to ITP.



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The spleen is one of the most misunderstood organs in the body. This narrated animation describes both the anatomy and function (physiology) of the spleen.

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There are two options for accessing the spleen for a splenectomy (A, 1 and 2). After the abdomen is entered, the spleen is located, and the artery leading to it is tied off (B). The ligament connecting the stomach and spleen is cut (C), as is the ligament connecting the spleen and colon (D). This frees the spleen for removal (E). (Illustration by GGS Inc.) There are two options for accessing the spleen for a splenectomy (A, 1 and 2). After the abdomen is entered, the spleen is located, and the artery leading to it is tied off (B). The ligament connecting the stomach and spleen is cut (C), as is the ligament connecting the spleen and colon (D). This frees the spleen for removal (E). (Illustration by GGS Inc.)




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Other Information

A splenectomy is a procedure that involves the removal of the spleen by operative means.

Vaccination for pneumococcus, H. influenza and meningococcus should be given pre-operatively if possible. In general, spleens are removed by laparoscopy (minimal access surgery) when the spleen is not too large and when the procedure is elective. It is performed by open surgery for trauma or large spleens. Both methods are major surgeries, and are performed under general anesthesia. The spleen is located and disconnected from its arteries. The ligaments holding the spleen in place are dissected and the spleen is removed. When indicated a drain is left in place and the incision(s) is closed. If necessary, tissue samples are sent to a laboratory for analysis.


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splenectomy

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